Water Services

Conservation Programs

In the Lower Mainland, the cost of potable water is rising significantly due to increasing water treatment costs and new infrastructure costs to service water demands. There are significant costs associated with constructing and operating the new Seymour-Capilano Water Filtration Plant, which is needed to meet new Canadian Drinking Water Guidelines.

Drinkable water is a scarce resource in the Lower Mainland and it is everyone’s responsibility to do their part to conserve water and help preserve our environment and live sustainably.

The benefits of saving water include:
  • Conserving water saves money for all of us. The need for publicly funded upgrades or new infrastructure to deliver and treat water can potentially be delayed or eliminated. It also means less water goes to treatment facilities, saving energy and money.
  • Energy is used more efficiently because less energy is used to heat water and pump potable water and wastewater.
  • Conserving water stimulates job creation. New economic activities are triggered for water-related manufacturing and service sectors, encouraging new business opportunities and job creation.
  • Conserving water is environmentally friendly. Reducing water use helps to preserve and protect fish and wildlife habitat. These natural attractions are essential to the economic health of BC’s tourism and outdoor recreation industries.

Following are various water conservation programs available for Richmond residents to participate.

Single-Family Water Meter Program
Single-family dwellings will receive mandatory water meters starting in 2014.

Multi-Family Water Meter Program
Multi-family dwelling residents have the opportunity to volunteer for a subsidized water meter, as well as free water conservation devices.

Toilet Rebate Program
Richmond residents are eligible to apply for a rebate on low-flush toilets.

Clothes Washer Rebate Program
Richmond residents are eligible to apply for a rebate on high efficiency clothes washers

Rain Barrel Program
Rain barrels are available for Richmond residents to purchase at subsidized prices.

Sprinkling Restrictions

Information & Resources

Where Does The Water Go?

Ever wonder where all the water goes in a typical home? Most of it goes down the toilet. Surprisingly, very little of it is used for actual drinking. These statistics do not account for water used outdoors.

PDF Document Multi-Family Water Use Allocation

PDF Document Single Family Water Use Allocation.