2012 Agendas & Minutes

May 28, 2012 - Minutes

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City of Richmond Meeting Minutes

Regular Council Meeting

 

Monday, May 28, 2012

Time:

7:00 p.m.

Place:

Council Chambers

Richmond City Hall

Present:

Mayor Malcolm D. Brodie

Councillor Chak Au

Councillor Linda Barnes

Councillor Derek Dang

Councillor Evelina Halsey-Brandt

Councillor Ken Johnston

Councillor Bill McNulty

Councillor Linda McPhail

Councillor Harold Steves

 

Corporate Officer – David Weber

Call to Order:

Mayor Brodie called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.

 

RES NO.

ITEM

 

 

 

 

MINUTES

 

R12/91

1.

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That the minutes of the Regular Council Meeting held on Monday, May 14, 2012, be adopted as circulated. 

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

AGENDA ADDITIONS & DELETIONS

 

R12/9-2

 

It was moved and seconded

 

 

 

(1)

That Item No. 25, the delegation from the Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society be deleted from the agenda;

 

 

(2)

That Agenda Item No. 3 be corrected to indicate that Item No. 27 is not delegable; and 

 

 

(3)

That the recommendation for Agenda Item No. 8, City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution, be revised to read as:

 

 

 

“(1)

WHEREAS for the purposes of this resolution the following terms are defined accordingly:

 

 

 

 

 

“Genetic Engineering and Modification / Genetically Engineered and Modified (G.E., G.M., G.M.O.)” refers to the direct manipulation of an organism’s DNA using recombinant DNA technology.  For the purposes of this resolution genetic engineering does NOT include traditional selective breeding, conjugation, fermentation, hybridization, in vitro fertilization, tissue culture, or marker assisted selection;

 

 

 

(2)

WHEREAS such crops may pose health and other risks; and

 

 

 

(3)

WHEREAS there are now a limited number of such crops grown in the City of Richmond each year,

 

 

 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:

 

 

 

(1)

That the City of Richmond hereby opposes the cultivation of genetically engineered plants and trees in the City of Richmond with the exception of existing GMO crops, and that from this Resolution forward, no further GM crops, trees, or plants should be grown in the City of Richmond. This also includes GM fruit trees, all GM plants and shrubbery, GM vegetables, GM commodity crops and any and all field tests for medical and experimental GM crops;

 

 

 

(2)

That Option 1: Support Consumer Choice/Advocate for Strengthened Senior Government Management as described in the report titled “City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution”, dated April 26, 2012, from the Interim Director, Sustainability and District Energy be endorsed;

 

 

 

(3)

That letters be sent on behalf of Council to the Prime Minister, Premier and leaders of the Federal and Provincial opposition, and copied to relevant Ministers in the Federal and Provincial governments, Richmond MPs and MLAs, Metro Vancouver, UBCM, the LMLGA, and the FCM, advising of these resolutions and requesting strengthened management of genetically modified plants, including the introduction of mandatory labelling requirements, more transparent assessment procedures and enhanced communication with the public; and

 

 

 

(4)

That the City of Richmond agrees to revisit this resolution as pertinent new information becomes available that affects this resolution.”

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

 

R12/9-3

2.

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That Council resolve into Committee of the Whole to hear delegations on agenda items (7:05 p.m.).

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

3.

Delegations from the floor on Agenda items:

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Jim Wright 8300, Osgoode Drive, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and read from his submission, which is attached as Schedule 1, and forms part of these minutes. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

De Whalen 13631 Blundell, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and read from her submission, which is attached as Schedule 2, and forms part of these minutes. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Kevin Hartman, Resident of Burnaby, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and expressed concerns about cross contamination in Burnaby from GM crops in the Hamilton area in Richmond.  The delegation spoke about a farmer in the prairies who had been sued by a biotech company after his crops had been contaminated by nearby GM crops.  He made reference to Section 7 of the Community Charter and stated that the purposes of a municipality include “providing for good government of its community; providing for stewardship of the public assets of its community, and fostering the economic, social and environmental well-being of its community.”

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Michelle Khong, presented a video showing the impact of GM crops on international farmers, including farmers in India, who, as a result of failed GM crops, and the inability to repay related debts, have committed suicide.  The video implied that once farmers start planting GM crops they become dependant on the biotech corporations for seeds.  The video also touched on the canola farmers in Saskatchewan who have been impacted by cross contamination, and their dependence on the biotech corporations.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Sandra Bourque, 6911 Dunsany Place, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that she owns land in Northern Alberta.  Ms. Bourque spoke about the loss of the European canola market because of contaminated canola in Canada.  She expressed her view that the motivation of the biotech corporations is for profit and not for the betterment of humanity, and that corporate patents in relation to the food supply is an immoral concept.  Ms. Bourque thanked Richmond City Council for having the courage to make a statement in opposition to GM crops.  In closing, she advised that Council should be cautious when considering the matter in the future as the biotech corporations may try to bring increased pressure to bear on the issue.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Mary Jones, spoke about the suicide rate amongst farmers in India as a result of failed GM cotton crops.  She also spoke about organic farmers whose crops had been contaminated by GM crops, and were subsequently sued by the biotech corporations for stealing the corporations’ seeds.  Ms. Jones stated that she loves the farm market in Richmond, and having the ability to buy organic foods for her children and grandchildren.  She further stated that the only way to ensure that you’re not eating GM foods is by buying organic foods.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Karen Morton, President and Founder, EcoUrbia Network, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and read from her submission, which is attached as Schedule 3, and forms part of these minutes.  Ms. Morton also provided additional information related to the labelling of GM foods, which is on file, City Clerk’s Office.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Robert Wager, Department of Biology, Vancouver Island University, spoke in opposition to the proposed resolution, and read from his submission, which is attached as Schedule 4, and forms part of these minutes.  Mr. Wager also submitted additional information related to the safety and sustainability of  GM foods, as well as information on the safety of organic foods, which is on file, City Clerk’s Office.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Megan Dartley, Farmer, Langley, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and noted that she appreciated the fact that the City of Richmond was giving people the option to choose.  She also noted that infection of crops as a result of contamination can result in people having to go to court.  The delegation spoke about how Canada has worked hard to implement international trade agreements, however, as a result of GM crops, farmers, in particular flax farmers, can no longer export their products because many countries do not allow GM products anymore.  She stated that there were no benefits for farmers who grow drought resistant GM crops, and questioned what use such crops are if no one is purchasing them. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Inga Hamley, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that global acceptance of GM crops is very small.  She highlighted that the trade agreements are the reason that North America is now realizing that other countries are banning GM crops.  Ms. Hamley spoke about: (i) the ban on Round Up in Argentina as a result of birth defects and other medical issues; (ii) the collapse of bee colonies, and the dangers of insecticides associated with bees collecting nectar and pollen from GM crops; and (iii) medical issues such as infertility and immune diseases, as well as accelerated aging in association with GM crops.  In conclusion, Ms. Hamley stated her opinion that regulation should not allow a corporation to get a patent and take control of the food supply. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Kimmy Hendaz, 9860 Dyke Road, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, stating that she appreciated what City Council was voting for and that it would make Richmond stand out.  Ms. Hendaz expressed her belief that farm land is not protected when inundated by GMOs, and stated that Richmond has a vibrant farming economy.  She spoke about the importance of having a choice about GM foods, and stated that it is not a choice when the global food market limits the local economy by competing with cheap global market prices.  Ms. Hendaz stated that she works at an apple orchard, and expressed concerns about GM apples, as well as resistant pathogen insects.  Ms. Hendaz also expressed appreciation for our democratic process which allows for the expression of public views on the matter and pointed out that many people worldwide have no such opportunity. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Rikshana Engineer, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and commended City Council for its bravery and intelligence to choose wisely on the matter.  She expressed her views by questioning whether Richmond wants corporations who have created products such as PCB’s and Agent Orange, controlling its food supply.  Ms. Engineer spoke about scientists who have been silenced for speaking out against the harms associated with GM products, and stated that GM crops are dangerous to the environment, and to human and animal health.  She noted that scientists have linked significant immune system damage, as well as an increase in allergies, and premature death in farm animals to GM products. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

David Chambers, Organic Farmer, Victoria, BC, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that he applauds the action of Richmond City Council.  He indicated that he has seen a lot of changes in farming and that people want to build an economically viable farming community, as Richmond has set up.  Mr. Chambers concluded by thanking Council for its actions, and saying that Richmond is making a powerful statement.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Natalie Chambers, Ecologist and Organic Farmer, Victoria, BC, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that she was representing the bees.  Ms. Chambers advised that there are 450 native species of bees in BC, and expressed concerns about a massive decline of pollinating bees on Vancouver Island.  She expressed her opinion that the decline in bee population was a result of the combination of pesticides, insecticides, climate changes, urban development, and a lack of flowers and foliage.  Ms. Chambers stated that bees are a key stone of the eco-system, as well as an indicator of the state of the eco system.  Ms. Chambers also spoke about the agricultural importance of pollination from bees.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Andres Aguilera Martinez, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that although he is only 19 years old, he knows better than to allow “sketchy” practices such as GMO production in Richmond.  Mr. Martinez stated that he was born in Columbia, and spoke about how Columbia had banned Round Up as a result of adverse health and environmental effects after cocoa plants and opium poppies were sprayed with Round Up in an effort to reduce the production of drugs such as cocaine and heroin.  The delegation stated that he would not want anything similar to happen in Richmond, and said that the citizens of Richmond are counting on Council to keep the future not genetically modified.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Dag Faulk, Nature’s Path Foods Inc. Organic Program Manager, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and noted that he has been an organic food inspector for 15 years.  He explained that a farmer does not necessarily lose their organic certification as a result of unintended GM contamination, as long as the farmer can demonstrate that they have taken the necessary steps to follow the industry standards, however, the farmer may still lose their customer base once the customers find out the products have been contaminated.  Mr. Faulk also spoke about how testing of GM products is conducted by biotech corporations, who then send a summary of their testing to the government.  He noted that such test results are not made available to the public, and no testing is done independently.  Mr. Faulk provided background information which is on file, City Clerk’s Office. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Richard Phillips, Richmond resident, stated that he had received calls from farmers in the BC Peace area requesting him to attend this Council meeting.  He advised that farmers in the BC Peace area grow GM crops in order to mitigate the issues in that area with weeds and insects.  He explained how the farmers are now able to spray the weeds out and as a result do not consume as much fossil fuel as in the past.  He concluded by expressing his opinion that the clean up resulting from cross-contamination of crops should be the responsibility of the biotech corporations.  In closing, Mr. Phillips indicated that the use of GM crops was not “the only tool in the tool box” when it comes to efficient agriculture. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Nathan Fenwick, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and made comments about how long term studies are needed to determine safety of products.  He noted that organic farmers have provided such studies, and expressed his belief that biotech companies have avoided the questions related to long term studies by destroying evidence and by silencing witnesses.  He made reference to the safety of the Bovine Growth Hormone, and further expressed his belief that anyone who stood against the growth hormone has been fired and blacklisted.  In closing, Mr. Fenwick stated that Richmond is doing the right thing by waiting until all the data is in.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Justin Charleston, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and thanked City Council for its decision.  He stated that he is a chef and advocate for growing your own food, as well as a concerned citizen.  He quoted portions of CropLife’s vision and mission statements which indicate that CropLife: “acts as an ambassador for the plant science industry;  and promotes sustainable agriculture which means a system of agriculture that over the long term, will enhance environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agricultural economy depends”.  He then stated that he would like to see the data from countries that have soil degradation as a result of GM crops.  He also spoke about the farmers that have committed suicide in India, and about tests conducted on hamsters which resulted in organ failure by the third generation.  In conclusion, Mr. Charleston stated that the City’s decision was the beginning of a larger movement to take back control of the food system. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Mark Sealing, Farmer at Barefoot Farms, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that he was looking at methods for growing crops in a sustainable way, and expressed concerns related to irrigation at the farm, and a fear of contamination from GE crops in the area.  He noted that the farmers at this farm would like to be self sufficient, and want to produce their own seeds for sale.  Mr. Sealing spoke about concerns associated with a corn field next to the land he farms, and stated that the issue is about the ability to grow what he wants without being limited by what his neighbours are growing.  

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Krista Barrack, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that many people are against GMOs.  She spoke about the benefits of consuming natural products, and stated that technology should evolve with nature, and it should not take away from what people eat. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Janice Tranberg, Vice President, Western Canada, CropLife Canada, spoke in opposition to the proposed resolution.  Ms. Tranberg stated that policy should be made on sound science and not emotion, and then with the aid of a PowerPoint presentation (on file, City Clerk’s Office), Ms. Tranberg provided the following highlights: 

 

 

·         

CropLife represents the developers, manufacturers and distributors of plant science innovations;

 

 

·         

GM products are safe, and are regulated by Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency;

 

 

·         

Vancouver Coastal Health has stated that there is no reason to ban GM products;

 

 

·         

GM crops benefit Canadian farmers as they increase yields and help farmers stay competitive;

 

 

·         

94% of canola, 80% of soybean, and 90% of corn grown in Canada are GM varieties;

 

 

·         

GM crops are important to the environment as they allow for the reduction of green house gas emissions to the equivalent of 6.9 million cars from the road for one year;

 

 

·         

Canada has an abundant food supply, and Canadians have been consuming these products for over two decades;

 

 

·         

GM crops keep foods affordable;

 

 

·         

consumers have the choice to purchase non-GM foods through the regulated organic labelling regime; and

 

 

·         

labelling of GM foods will not improve safety, and will impose costs on producers and consumers. 

 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Courtenay Peacher, Richmond Resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and echoed the comments of previous speakers.  She spoke about how banning GMOs will eliminate harmful effects that may impact future generations.  She expressed her belief that there is not enough scientific evidence to indicate that GMOs are safe, and stated that there are enough facts that indicate the GMOs may not be safe.  In closing, the delegation expressed her view that we have to listen to the younger generations on this issue.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Francois St. Henry, 8440 Fairbrook Crescent, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and expressed concerns about a biotech company that has donated computers to the school his son attends, and about the educational information that is being prepared for high school students on transgenic techniques.  Mr. Henry also expressed concerns about how his son has been treated differently in school since his son questioned the information presented at the school on the biotech corporation.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Art Bonkey, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that Council’s decision will mean nothing to the biotech companies.  He continued by stating that the decision will mean more to the City of Richmond in terms of branding its food system.  He expressed his opinion that the scale of agricultural research in BC is minimal, and that the proposed resolution is positive, and will stand up for Richmond agriculture, farmers, and those who buy local Richmond foods. 

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Yvette Cassidy, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that Richmond is a truly remarkable place which provides diversity for farming culture.  She further stated that we need to make a decision for the next generations.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Arzeena Hamir, 8480 Dayton Court, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and made reference to research conducted at the University of Guelph on why farmers grow GMOs and the related economic benefits.  She noted that the research indicated that GMOs are no longer profitable for farmers, and that GM technology has contributed only two traits to contemporary agriculture, which are herbicide tolerance, and DT.  She stated that GM is an abysmal failure, and continued by speaking about conventional plant breeding.  Ms. Hamir advised that the Sharing Farm in Terra Nova practices traditional crop breeding, and there is research being conducted on bean varieties that are drought resistant through traditional methods of breeding without using genetic modification.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Virginia Chiu, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that politics is not about emotion, but it also cannot be just about scientific evidence.  She made the point that evidence can be incorrect and require a change years after it has been presented.  She concluded by stating that what is true to Richmond is to stay a great leader in this area.  

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Alex Worthington, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that GMO foods and biotech corporations are being kicked out of countries.  He made reference to the earthquake that took place in Haiti, and advised that Haitian farmers burned 475 tonnes of seeds that had been donated by a biotech corporation, and that GM seeds are now banned in most parts of the world except North America.  Mr. Worthington expressed his opinion that GM foods cause organ failure, impact the quality of life , and are bad for the farmers.  He stated that only the biotech companies are benefiting from GMO foods. In closing, he stated that Richmond has to show Canada the way and be a shining light in the darkness.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Karen Hobble, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and advised that she had lived on Salt Spring Island where she had apprenticed with a seeder who produced seeds for sale.  She further advised that farmers on Salt Spring Island banned together to say no to genetic engineering.  Ms. Hobble noted that she recently moved back to Richmond, and expressed her belief that Richmond’s agricultural community is hurting.  In closing, Ms. Hobble stated that both conventional and organic farmers all need to come together to say no to GMOs.   

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Bania Hadi, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and in response to a statement made by another delegate about how labelling GM foods would impose costs on producers and consumers.  Mr. Hadi stated his belief that people’s health as well as the future of our children’s health is more important than economic value or costs.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Miles Smart, Richmond farmer, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and advised that his family grows a variety of  crops that are sold to local restaurants and at farmer’s markets.  He raised concern with claims made that GM foods are safe, as the corporations that developed the seeds are the same as those that had claimed that products such as DDT were safe.  With respect to the notion that GM crops increase yield, Mr. Smart stated that the only way yields are increased is by increasing labour investments.  He continued by explaining how all seeds grow equally as a result of hybridization.  In closing, Mr. Smart thanked Richmond City Council for having the foresight to consider the proposed resolution.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Diana Li, Richmond resident, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that she was a grade 11 student who would like to eat food that will not kill her immune system.  She advised that her grandmother has taught her about GMOs, and noted that the information shared by her grandmother on the matter is different from what she has learned in school.  She expressed concern that she felt that she hasn’t been receiving real information through her school.  In closing, Ms. Li thanked Council for supporting her future.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Larry Tolton, 11366 Bird Road, spoke in support of the proposed resolution.  Mr. Tolton commented that the concept of proof was useful in relation to mathematical systems, but that it is difficult to prove things in relation to biology.  The delegation indicated that a person can't say that they can prove safety as they haven't observed all relevant situation, however, they can say that there is evidence or observation of harm.  The delegation then stated that in relation to GM crops, there is no proof of increased yields or nutrition and there is no proof of decreased water usage.  The delegation then commented that decisions can be either reversible or irreversible and that a decision to allow GMOs into Richmond would be irreversible.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Betty Lou Cedarberg, Richmond farmer, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and advised that she and her husband live on a half acre of farmland, and that their mandate is to eat the produce they grow.  She expressed concerns about the security of the food supply, stating that people do not know what is in GM foods, or how consuming those foods will impact people’s genes in the future. In conclusion, the delegation stated that she applauded Richmond City Council’s for the proposed resolution that would go out to other levels of government.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

 

 

Colin Dring, Executive Director, Richmond Food Security Society, spoke in support of the proposed resolution, and stated that (i) a sustainable agriculture cannot include GMOs; and (ii) there is no evidence that GMOs  has contributed to local food security.

 

 

Item No. 8 – City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution and Item No. 13 - City Centre Area Plan (CCAP) Text Amendments: Density Calculation Clarification For Minor Streets, Lanes, Mews, Parks, and Open Spaces Not Identified In Richmond’s Development Cost Charges (DCC) Program

 

 

Michael Wolfe, 9731 Odlin Road, made reference to Part (4) of the proposed resolution, which indicates that the City of Richmond will revisit this resolution as pertinent information become available, and advised City Council to expect lobbying efforts from biotech corporations.

 

 

With respect to Item No. 13, Mr. Wolfe stated that the matter should be removed from the consent agenda and dealt with subsequent to further public consultation.

 

R12/9-4

4.

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That Committee rise and report (9:24 p.m.).

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

CONSENT AGENDA

 

R12/9-5

5.

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That Items 6 through 23 with the removal of Item No. 11, be adopted by general consent.

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

6.

COMMITTEE MINUTES

 

 

 

That the minutes of:

 

 

(1)

the Community Safety Committee meeting held on Tuesday, May 15, 2012;

 

 

(2)

the General Purposes Committee meeting held on Tuesday, May 22, 2012;

 

 

(3)

the Planning Committee meeting held on Wednesday, May 23, 2012; and

 

 

(4)

the Public Works & Transportation Committee meeting held on Thursday, May 24, 2012;

 

 

be received for information.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

7.

COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRAFFIC – 16000 BLK OF RIVER ROAD

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8737, 10-6450-01, XR 12-8060-20-8737) (REDMS No. 3240955)

 

 

That the proposed control and enforcement measures related to commercial vehicles on River Road as outlined in the staff report titled Commercial Vehicle Traffic – 16000 Blk Of River Road (dated April 2, 2012, from the General Manager, Law & Community Safety), be endorsed.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

8.

City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

(File Ref. No. 008-4040-08-01) (REDMS No. 3518727, 3523078, 3523135, 3521708)

 

 

(1)

WHEREAS for the purposes of this resolution the following terms are defined accordingly:

 

 

 

 

“Genetic Engineering and Modification / Genetically Engineered and Modified (G.E., G.M., G.M.O.)” refers to the direct manipulation of an organism’s DNA using recombinant DNA technology.  For the purposes of this resolution genetic engineering does NOT include traditional selective breeding, conjugation, fermentation, hybridization, in vitro fertilization, tissue culture, or marker assisted selection;

 

 

(2)

WHEREAS such crops may pose health and other risks; and

 

 

(3)

WHEREAS there are now a limited number of such crops grown in the City of Richmond each year,

 

 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:

 

 

(1)

That the City of Richmond hereby opposes the cultivation of genetically engineered plants and trees in the City of Richmond with the exception of existing GMO crops, and that from this Resolution forward, no further GM crops, trees, or plants should be grown in the City of Richmond. This also includes GM fruit trees, all GM plants and shrubbery, GM vegetables, GM commodity crops and any and all field tests for medical and experimental GM crops;

 

 

(2)

That Option 1: Support Consumer Choice/Advocate for Strengthened Senior Government Management as described in the report titled “City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution”, dated April 26, 2012, from the Interim Director, Sustainability and District Energy be endorsed;

 

 

(3)

That letters be sent on behalf of Council to the Prime Minister, Premier and leaders of the Federal and Provincial opposition, and copied to relevant Ministers in the Federal and Provincial governments, Richmond MPs and MLAs, Metro Vancouver, UBCM, the LMLGA, and the FCM, advising of these resolutions and requesting strengthened management of genetically modified plants, including the introduction of mandatory labelling requirements, more transparent assessment procedures and enhanced communication with the public; and

 

 

(4)

That the City of Richmond agrees to revisit this resolution as pertinent new information becomes available that affects this resolution.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

9.

AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011 ANNUAL REPORT AND 2012 WORK PROGRAM

(File Ref. No. 01-0100-20-AADV1-01) (REDMS No. 3517976)

 

 

That the 2012 Agricultural Advisory Committee work program be approved.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

10.

APPLICATION BY KAIMAN ENTERPRISES CO. LTD. FOR REZONING AT 22560, 22600 AND 22620 GILLEY ROAD FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/B) TO TOWN HOUSING (ZT11) – HAMILTON

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8750, RZ 06-344606) (REDMS No. 3519618, 3170734, 3188232)

 

 

That Bylaw No. 8750, for the rezoning of 22560, 22600 and 22620 Gilley Road from “Single Detached (RS1/B)” to “Town Housing (ZT11) - Hamilton”, be referred to the June 18, 2012 Public Hearing.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

11.

APPLICATION BY AMRIT MAHARAJ FOR REZONING AT 4820 GARRY STREET FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/E) TO SINGLE DETACHED (RS2/A)

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8825, RZ 11-582830) (REDMS No.3374326, 822951, 3519623, 3520389)

 

 

See Page 26 for action taken on this matter.

 

 

12.

APPLICATION BY CITY OF RICHMOND FOR REZONING AT 23591 WESTMINSTER HWY. FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/F) TO SCHOOL & INSTITUTIONAL USE (SI)

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8880/8881, RZ 12-601319) (REDMS No. 3482714, 3487910, 3486618)

 

 

(1)

That Bylaw No. 8880 to amend the Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100, by repealing the existing land use designation in Schedule 2.14 (Hamilton Area Plan) for 23591 Westminster Hwy. and by designating it “Community Facilities”, be introduced and given first reading;

 

 

(2)

That Bylaw No. 8880, having been considered in conjunction with:

 

 

 

(a)

the City’s Financial Plan and Capital Program;

 

 

 

(b)

the Greater Vancouver Regional District Solid Waste and Liquid Waste Management Plans;

 

 

 

is hereby deemed to be consistent with said program and plans, in accordance with Section 882(3)(a) of the Local Government Act;

 

 

(3)

That Bylaw No. 8880, having been considered in accordance with OCP Bylaw Preparation Consultation Policy 5043, is hereby deemed not to require further consultation; and

 

 

(4)

That Bylaw No. 8881, for the rezoning of 23591 Westminster Hwy. from “Single Detached (RS1/F)” to “School & Institutional Use (SI)”  be introduced and given first reading.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

13.

CITY CENTRE AREA PLAN (CCAP) TEXT AMENDMENTS: DENSITY CALCULATION CLARIFICATION FOR MINOR STREETS, LANES, MEWS, PARKS, AND OPEN SPACES NOT IDENTIFIED IN RICHMOND’S DEVELOPMENT COST CHARGE (DCC) PROGRAM

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8888, 08-4045-20-10/2012-Vol 01) (REDMS No. 3517757, 3517755)

 

 

(1)

That Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 8888, which amends Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100 by making text amendments to Schedule 2.10 (City Centre Area Plan) to clarify the intent of the Plan in respect to lands voluntarily dedicated or otherwise transferred to the City by developers for use as “minor streets” (i.e., as designated under the Plan), lanes, mews, parks, and open spaces not identified in the Development Cost Charge (DCC) program for land acquisition purposes, and make clear that the City may, in its discretion on a project-by-project basis, include such lands in the calculation of “net development site” for the purpose of determining the maximum permitted floor area, be introduced and given first reading.

 

 

(2)

That Bylaw No. 8888, having been considered in conjunction with:

 

 

 

(a)

the City’s Financial Plan and Capital Program;

 

 

 

(b)

the Greater Vancouver Regional District Solid Waste and Liquid Waste Management Plans; and
is hereby deemed to be consistent with said program and plans, in accordance with Section 882(3)(a) of the Local Government Act.

 

 

(3)

That Bylaw No. 8888, having been considered in accordance with OCP Bylaw Preparation Consultation Policy 5043, is hereby deemed not to require further consultation.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

14.

APPLICATION BY AVION HOMES LTD. FOR REZONING AT 7431 FRANCIS ROAD FROM ASSEMBLY (ASY) TO SINGLE DETACHED (RS2/E)

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8900/8901, RZ 11-596457) (REDMS No. 3518170, 280005, 3519090, 3519123)

 

 

(1)

That Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 8900, to redesignate 7431 Francis Road:

 

 

 

(a)

from "Community Institutional" to "Neighbourhood Residential" in Attachment 1 to Schedule 1 of Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100 (Generalized Land Use Map); and

 

 

 

(b)

from "Community Institutional" to "Low-Density Residential" in Attachment 2 to Schedule 1 of Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100 (Specific Land Use Map);

 

 

 

be introduced and given first reading;

 

 

(2)

That Bylaw No. 8900, having been considered in conjunction with:

 

 

 

(a)

the City’s Financial Plan and Capital Program; and

 

 

 

(b)

the Greater Vancouver Regional District Solid Waste and Liquid Waste Management Plans;

 

 

 

is hereby deemed to be consistent with said program and plans, in accordance with Section 882(3)(a) of the Local Government Act;

 

 

(3)

That Bylaw No. 8900, having been considered in accordance with OCP Bylaw Preparation Consultation Policy 5043, is hereby deemed not to require further consultation; and

 

 

(4)

That Bylaw No. 8901, for the rezoning of 7431 Francis Road from "Assembly (ASY)" to "Single Detached (RS2/E)", be introduced and given first reading.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

15.

APPLICATION BY TIMOTHY TSE FOR REZONING AT 7840 BENNETT ROAD FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/E) TO INFILL RESIDENTIAL (RI2)

(File Ref. No.:  12-8060-20-8902, RZ 09-496145) (REDMS No. 3496755, 946459, 3521255)

 

 

That Bylaw No. 8902, for the rezoning of 7840 Bennett Road from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Infill Residential (RI2)”, be introduced and given first reading.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

16.

TELECOMMUNICATION ANTENNAS: AMENDMENTS TO ZONING BYLAW 8500 AND DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION FEES BYLAW 7984

(File Ref. No.:  12-8060-20-8904/8905) (REDMS No. 3522269, 3521929, 3522330)

 

 

(1)

That the proposed “Richmond Zoning Bylaw 8500, Amendment Bylaw No. 8904,” concerning maximum heights for telecommunications antennas, be introduced and given first reading; and

 

 

(2)

That the proposed “Development Applications Fees Bylaw 7984, Amendment Bylaw 8905,” concerning fees for Telecommunications Antenna Consultation and Siting Protocol applications, be introduced and given first, second and third readings.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

17.

ELECTRIC VEHICLE – COMMUNITY CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE GRANT FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

(File Ref. No. 10-6460-03) (REDMS No. 3514789)

 

 

That an application for a community electric vehicle charging plan and infrastructure grant be submitted to the Fraser Basin Council upon announcement of the availability of provincial funding for this work.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

18.

REPORT 2011: RECYCLING AND SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT - TOGETHER WE'RE MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN

(File Ref. No. 10-6370-01) (REDMS No. 3519135 v.3)

 

 

That the “2011 Recycling and Solid Waste Management – Together We're Making Change Happen” annual report be endorsed and made available to the community through the City’s website and other communication medium.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

19.

GREEN CART PILOT PROGRAM RESULTS

(File Ref. No. 10-6370-10-05) (REDMS No. 3521669 v.3)

 

 

(1)

That based on the successful results of the Green Cart Pilot Program, staff report back on costs and options for an expanded cart-based collection program for a food scraps and organics recycling program for all townhome units in conjunction with introduction of a similar program for residents in single-family homes; and

 

 

(2)

That the Green Cart Pilot program be continued pending a determination by Council on actions relating to a permanent food scraps/organics recycling program for townhomes.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

20.

2012 FLOOD PROTECTION GRANT PROGRAM

(File Ref. No. 10-6045-01, 09-1087-11-01) (REDMS No. 3513301 v.4)

 

 

(1)

That the Chief Administrative Officer and General Manager Engineering and Public Works be authorized to negotiate and execute the cost share agreements for the Williams Road Drainage Pump Station and the No. 1 Road North Drainage Pump Station which were approved for funding by the Province as part of the 2010 Provincial Flood Protection Program;

 

 

(2)

That the following projects be endorsed for submission to the 2012 Provincial Flood Protection Grant Program:

 

 

 

(a)

McCallan Drainage Pump Station Upgrade;

 

 

 

(b)

No. 2 Road Drainage Pump Station Upgrade;

 

 

 

(c)

Dike Upgrade and Raise, McCallan Road to No. 2 Road;

 

 

 

(d)

South Dike Seismic Upgrade No. 4 Road to Shell Right of Way;

 

 

 

(e)

Dike Upgrade at Nelson Road Drainage Pump Station;

 

 

 

(f)

South Dike Upgrade Erosion Control Rip-Rap Replacement and Raise, No. 7 Road to ±1000 metres west;

 

 

 

(g)

Dike Upgrade and Raise from Hollybridge Street to approximately 50 metres east of Dinsmore Bridge;

 

 

(3)

That should any of the above submissions be successful, the Chief Administrative Officer and General Manager Engineering and Public Works be authorized to negotiate and execute the cost share agreements with the Province.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

21.

PERMITS FOR CITY PUMP STATIONS

(File Ref. No. 01-0140-20-PMVA1) (REDMS No. 3519553)

 

 

That the Chief Administrative Officer and the General Manager, Engineering and Public Works be authorized to sign Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) Permits in the format shown in Attachment 1 as needed for the construction and operation of current and future City pump stations.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

22.

ICBC/CITY OF RICHMOND ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM – PROPOSED PROJECTS FOR 2012

(File Ref. No. 01-0150-20-ICBC1-01) (REDMS No. 3481661)

 

 

(1)

That the list of proposed road safety improvement projects, as described in the report, be endorsed for submission to the ICBC 2012 Road Improvement Program for consideration of cost sharing funding; and

 

 

(2)

That should the above applications be successful, the Chief Administrative Officer and General Manager, Planning and Development be authorized to negotiate and execute the cost-share agreements and the 2012 Capital Plan and 5-Year (2012-2016) Financial Plan be amended accordingly.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

23.

PROPOSED PARKING STRATEGY FOR STEVESTON VILLAGE

(File Ref. No. 10-6455-01) (REDMS No. 3501979 v.5)

 

 

(1)

That Option 1 to retain free public parking on City-managed parking spaces in the Steveston Village area, as described in the report, be endorsed as a trial strategy and that staff report back on its effectiveness after the trial period in Fall 2012;

 

 

(2)

That Council send a letter to the Steveston Harbour Authority (SHA) and the Steveston Merchants Association expressing its support of the two parties working together to facilitate employee parking in the SHA lot on Chatham Street on a temporary basis from June 11 to September 30, 2012, as generally proposed in Attachment 2;

 

 

(3)

That staff be directed to negotiate the renewal of the City’s licence of occupancy for 3771 Bayview Street with the Steveston Harbour Authority and report back on the outcome of these discussions as soon as possible;

 

 

(4)

That, as described in the report, staff be directed to:

 

 

 

(a)

develop short- and long-term streetscape visions for Bayview Street and Chatham Street and report back by the end of 2012; and

 

 

 

(b)

undertake the supplementary improvements to support other travel modes.

 

 

(5)

That staff investigate the possibility of accommodating the parking needs of those that paid into the Steveston Parking Fund and report back.

 

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

 

*****************************

 

 

CONSIDERATION OF MATTERS REMOVED FROM THE CONSENT AGENDA

*****************************

 

 

 

In accordance with Section 100 of the Community Charter, Councillor Barnes declared herself to be in a potential conflict of interest as she owns property in the area and left the meeting (10:11 p.m.).

 

 

11.

APPLICATION BY AMRIT MAHARAJ FOR REZONING AT 4820 GARRY STREET FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/E) TO SINGLE DETACHED (RS2/A)

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8825, RZ 11-582830) (REDMS No.3374326, 822951, 3519623, 3520389)

R12/9-6

 

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That Bylaw No. 8825, for the rezoning of 4820 Garry Street from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Single Detached (RS2/A)”, be introduced and given first reading.

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

Councillor Barnes returned to the meeting (10:12 p.m.).

 

 

 

NON-CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS

 

 

 

PLANNING COMMITTEE –
Councillor Bill McNulty, Chair

 

 

 

In accordance with Section 100 of the Community Charter, Councillor Dang declared himself to be in a potential conflict of interest as he owns property in the area and left the meeting (10:13 p.m.).

 

 

24.

SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT: APPLICATION BY WESTERN MAPLE LANE HOLDINGS LTD. FOR REZONING AT 9160 NO. 2 ROAD FROM SINGLE DETACHED (RS1/E) TO MEDIUM DENSITY TOWNHOUSES (RTM3)

(File Ref. No. 12-8060-20-8769, RZ 10-516267) (REDMS No. 3502618, 3213418, 3510056, 3218461)

R12/9-7

 

It was moved and seconded

 

 

(1)

That Bylaw No. 8769, for the rezoning of 9160 No. 2 Road from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Medium Density Townhouses (RTM3)”, be forwarded to Public Hearing, to be held on Monday, June 18, 2012; and

 

 

(2)

That the Public Hearing notification area be expanded from the standard 50 m radius to include the area shown in Attachment 14 of the Report to Committee dated June 17, 2011.

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

Councillor Dang returned to the meeting (10:18 p.m.).

 

 

 

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMNTS

 

 

Mayor Brodie made the following announcement with respect to the RCMP Contract:

 

 

(1)

That the Provincial Minister of Justice be advised that the City will not prior to May 31, 2012 execute the proposed Municipal Police Unit Agreement dated April 1, 2012 and that a public information strategy be prepared and implemented.

 

 

(2)

That the Mayor and senior staff meet with Provincial Ministers to communicate the City’s position and to facilitate future discussions regarding the provision of police services in the City.

 

 

 

BYLAWS FOR ADOPTION

 

R12/9-8

 

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That the following bylaws each be adopted:

 

 

Richmond Zoning Bylaw No. 8500, Amendment Bylaw No. 8759

 

 

Richmond Zoning Bylaw No. 8500, Amendment Bylaw No. 8785

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

DEVELOPMENT PERMIT PANEL

 

R12/9-9

25.

It was moved and seconded

 

 

(1)

That the Chair’s report for the Development Permit Panel meetings held on March 28, 2012, and January 25, 2012, be received for information; and

 

 

 

(2)

That the recommendations of the Panel to authorize the issuance of:

 

 

(a)

a Development Permit (DP 11-585139) for the property at 8399 Jones Road (formerly 7500, 7520, 7540 and 7560 St. Albans Road); and

 

 

 

(b)

a Development Permit (DP 10-545013) for the property at 8540 No. 3 Road;

 

 

 

be endorsed, and the Permits so issued.

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

R12/9-10

 

It was moved and seconded

 

 

That the meeting adjourn (10:25 p.m.).

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

Certified a true and correct copy of the Minutes of the Regular Meeting of the Council of the City of Richmond held on Monday, May 28, 2012.

_________________________________

_________________________________

Mayor (Malcolm D. Brodie)

Corporate Officer (David Weber)

 

5/31/2012 2:37:25 PM